How many regions are there in italy?

How many regions are there in italy 1 how many regions are there in italy

How many regions are there in Italy?

There are 20 regions in Italy. These regions are divided into two categories: 15 regions in mainland Italy and five regions in Italy’s insular territories. The regions in mainland Italy are Abruzzo, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Lazio, Liguria, Lombardy, Marche, Molise, Piedmont, Puglia, Tuscany, and Umbria. The regions in Italy’s insular territories are Aosta Valley, Sardinia, Sicily, Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, and Veneto.

Each region in Italy has its own unique history, culture, and traditions, as well as its own natural beauty and economic characteristics. The regions are responsible for the administration of various public services and policies, such as healthcare, education, and transportation, and they also play a role in the development of regional economic development and tourism.

The 20 regions of Italy are:

  1. Abruzzo
  2. Aosta Valley
  3. Basilicata
  4. Calabria
  5. Campania
  6. Emilia-Romagna
  7. Friuli-Venezia Giulia
  8. Lazio
  9. Liguria
  10. Lombardy
  11. Marche
  12. Molise
  13. Piedmont
  14. Puglia
  15. Sardinia
  16. Sicily
  17. Tuscany
  18. Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol
  19. Umbria
  20. Veneto

Regions of Italy

Regions of Italy
Regions of Italy

Abruzzo

Abruzzo is bordered by the regions of Marche to the north, Lazio to the west, Molise to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east.

Abruzzo is known for its natural beauty, including the Apennine Mountains, the Maiella National Park, and the Gran Sasso e Monti Della Laga National Park. The region is also known for its ski resorts, which attract visitors from all over Italy and beyond. The region is also home to many important cities, including L’Aquila, the capital city, and other major cities such as Pescara, Chieti, and Teramo.

Abruzzo has a population of about 1.4 million people and is divided into four provinces: L’Aquila, Chieti, Pescara, and Teramo.

Aosta Valley

The Aosta Valley is a region located in northwest Italy. It is the smallest and least populous region in Italy, and it is also the only region in Italy that is fully bilingual, with both Italian and French being official languages. The Aosta Valley is bordered by the regions of Piedmont and Lombardy to the west, Switzerland to the north, and France to the west and south.

The Aosta Valley is known for its natural beauty, including the Alps, the Mont Blanc massif, and the Gran Paradiso National Park. The region is also known for its ski resorts, which attract visitors from all over Italy and beyond. The region is home to many important cities, including Aosta, the capital city, and other major cities such as Courmayeur and Gressoney-La-Trinité.

The Aosta Valley has a population of about 125,000 people and is divided into seven provinces: Aosta, Aosta Valley, Courmayeur, Gressoney-La-Trinité, La Salle, Morgex, and Pré-Saint-Didier.

Basilicata

Basilicata is a region located in southern Italy. It is bordered by the regions of Campania to the west, Apulia to the east, and Calabria to the south. It is also bordered by the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west and the Ionian Sea to the east.

Basilicata is known for its natural beauty, including the Apennine Mountains, the Pollino National Park, and the Alta Val d’Agri National Park. The region is also known for its historic towns, such as Matera, which is home to the Sassi, a series of ancient cave dwellings that have been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The region is home to many important cities, including Potenza, the capital city, and other major cities such as Matera and Melfi.

Basilicata has a population of about 600,000 people and is divided into two provinces: Matera and Potenza. The region is known for its diverse cultural influences, including Roman, Greek, and Norman influences, which are reflected in the region’s language, cuisine, and architecture. Basilicata is also known for its production of wine, olive oil, and other agricultural products.

Calabria

Calabria is a region located in southern Italy. It is the southernmost region in Italy and is bordered by the regions of Basilicata to the north and Puglia to the north and east. It is also bordered by the Ionian Sea to the east and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west.

Calabria is known for its natural beauty, including the Aspromonte National Park, the Pollino National Park, and the Sila National Park. The region is also known for its long coastline, which includes many beautiful beaches and resorts. The region is home to many important cities, including Catanzaro, the capital city, and other major cities such as Cosenza and Reggio Calabria.

Calabria has a population of about 2 million people and is divided into nine provinces: Catanzaro, Cosenza, Crotone, Reggio Calabria, Vibo Valentia, Catanzaro, Cosenza, Crotone, and Reggio Calabria. The region is known for its diverse cultural influences, including Greek, Roman, and Norman influences, which are reflected in the region’s language, cuisine, and architecture. Calabria is also known for its production of wine, olive oil, and other agricultural products.

Campania

Campania is a region located in southern Italy. It is bordered by the regions of Lazio to the north, Molise to the east, and Basilicata to the south. It is also bordered by the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west.

Campania is known for its natural beauty, including the Amalfi Coast, the Vesuvius National Park, and the Cilento and Vallo di Diano National Park. The region is also home to many important cities, including Naples, the capital city, and other major cities such as Salerno, Caserta, and Avellino.

Campania has a population of about 6 million people and is divided into five provinces: Avellino, Benevento, Caserta, Naples, and Salerno. The region is known for its diverse cultural influences, including Greek, Roman, and Norman influences, which are reflected in the region’s language, cuisine, and architecture. Campania is also known for its production of wine, olive oil, and other agricultural products. The region is home to many famous tourist destinations, including the islands of Capri and Ischia, the ancient city of Pompeii, and the Royal Palace of Caserta.

Emilia-Romagna

Emilia-Romagna is a region in northern Italy, located in the Po Valley. It is made up of two historical regions, Emilia and Romagna, and its capital is Bologna. The region is known for its rich culinary tradition, including dishes such as lasagna, tortellini, and prosciutto. It is also home to several historical cities like Parma, Modena, and Ferrara. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, industry, and tourism.

Friuli-Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia is a region in northeastern Italy, located in the Alpine and Adriatic areas. It is made up of two historical regions, Friuli and Venezia Giulia, and its capital is Trieste. The region is known for its diverse cultural heritage, as it has been influenced by its proximity to Austria, Slovenia, and Croatia. It is also home to several historical cities like Udine, Cividale del Friuli, and Gorizia. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, industry, and tourism. The region is also famous for its wines, particularly white wines like Ribolla Gialla, Friulano and Verduzzo.

Lazio

Lazio is a region in central Italy, located in the heart of the country. Its capital is Rome, which is also the capital of Italy. The region is known for its rich history and cultural heritage, as it is home to many ancient ruins and historical landmarks, including the Colosseum, the Pantheon, and the Roman Forum. The economy of the region is based on services, particularly tourism, and also on agriculture, and industry. The Region is also famous for its wine production, especially for its white wines such as Frascati and Est! Est!! Est!!! di Montefiascone and red wines like Cesanese and the famous red wine of the Castelli Romani area such as the wines from the towns of Frascati and Marino.

Liguria

Liguria is a region in northwest Italy, located on the Mediterranean coast. Its capital is Genoa. The region is known for its picturesque landscape, rugged coastline and picturesque villages such as Cinque Terre, Portofino and Camogli. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, particularly the cultivation of olives and lemons, and on tourism. The region is also famous for its seafood, and for the production of the famous basil pesto sauce. Liguria is also a major producer of wines, particularly white wines like Vermentino and Pigato and a sweet wine called Sciacchetrà.

Lombardy

Lombardy is a region in northern Italy, located in the Po Valley. It’s the most populous and economically developed region in Italy. Its capital is Milan, the second-largest city in Italy and a major global city in fashion, design, finance, and culture. The region is known for its lakes, like Lake Como and Lake Garda, and for its mountains, like the Swiss Alps, which are popular tourist destinations. Lombardy has a strong economy based on manufacturing, services, and finance. The region is also a major producer of wines, particularly sparkling wines like Franciacorta and Oltrepò Pavese. Lombardy is also known for its traditional cuisine, featuring dishes such as risotto, polenta, and ossobuco.

Marche

Marche is a region in central-eastern Italy, located along the Adriatic coast. Its capital is Ancona. The region is known for its picturesque countryside, rolling hills and historic towns such as Urbino, which was the birthplace of the famous Renaissance artist Raphael. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, tourism, and manufacturing, particularly the production of footwear, ceramics and furniture. The region is also famous for its wines such as Verdicchio, Rosso Conero and Rosso Piceno. The gastronomy of the region features dishes such as “Vincisgrassi” a lasagna-like baked pasta dish, “brodetto” a fish-based soup, and “crescia” a type of focaccia bread.

Molise

Molise is a region in southern Italy, located between Lazio and Abruzzo. It is the second-smallest region in Italy after Valle d’Aosta. Its capital is Campobasso. The region is known for its unspoiled natural beauty, with mountains, forests and charming hilltop towns such as Agnone, which is famous for its bells-making tradition. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, particularly sheep and cattle breeding, and on tourism. The region is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “scrippelle” (a kind of crepe), “timballo” (a type of pasta pie), and “pasta alla molise” (a pasta dish with pork sausage, onions, and tomato sauce).
Piedmont

Puglia

Piedmont is a region in northwest Italy, located at the foot of the Alps. Its capital is Turin. The region is known for its natural beauty, including the famous wine region of Barolo, and its cultural heritage, including the historic city of Turin, which was the first capital of Italy. Piedmont has a strong economy based on manufacturing, particularly the production of automobiles, and on agriculture, particularly the cultivation of wine grapes and hazelnuts. The region is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “bagna cauda” (a warm dip made of anchovies, garlic, and olive oil), “tajarin” (a type of egg pasta), and “risotto alla piemontese” (a risotto dish with beef marrow and white truffle). Piedmont is also a major wine producer, particularly for red wines like Barolo, Barbera and Nebbiolo.

Sardinia

Sardinia is an island region in Italy, located in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean, after Sicily. Its capital is Cagliari. The region is known for its unspoiled natural beauty, including its beaches, mountains, and forests, as well as for its rich cultural heritage, including the ancient Nuragic civilization. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, particularly the cultivation of wheat, grapes, and olives, and on tourism. Sardinia is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “culurgiones” (a type of pasta filled with potatoes and mint), “pane carasau” (a type of thin and crispy bread), and “cordula” (a type of tripe). The region is also known for its wines such as Vermentino, Cannonau and Carignano del Sulcis.

Sicily

Sicily is an island region in Italy, located in the Mediterranean Sea. It is the largest island in the Mediterranean and is located just off the “toe” of the Italian Peninsula. Its capital is Palermo. The region is known for its rich cultural heritage, including ancient Greek and Roman ruins, and its picturesque landscapes, including Mount Etna, an active volcano. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, particularly the cultivation of citrus fruits, olives, and grapes, as well as on tourism. The region is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “caponata” (a sweet and sour eggplant dish), “arancini” (a type of rice ball), and “pasta alla Norma” (a pasta dish with eggplant, tomato sauce and ricotta salata). Sicily is also a major wine producer, particularly for red wines like Nero d’Avola, Nerello Mascalese and Moscato di Pantelleria.

Tuscany

Tuscany is a region in central Italy, located in the heart of the country. Its capital is Florence. The region is known for its rich cultural heritage, including the works of famous artists such as Michelangelo, Botticelli, and Leonardo da Vinci, and for its picturesque landscapes, including rolling hills, vineyards, and olive groves. The economy of the region is based on tourism, agriculture, and manufacturing, particularly the production of leather goods and metals. Tuscany is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “ribollita” (a bread and vegetable soup), “bistecca alla Fiorentina” (a steak dish), and “pici” (a type of thick spaghetti). The region is also known for its wines such as Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vernaccia di San Gimignano.

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol

Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol is a region in Northern Italy, located in the Alpine area. It is made up of two historical regions, Trentino and Alto Adige, also known as South Tyrol. The capital of Trentino is Trento, and the capital of Alto Adige is Bolzano. The region is known for its natural beauty, including the Dolomites mountain range and the Adige River, as well as for its cultural heritage, which reflects its history as part of Austria-Hungary. The economy of the region is based on tourism, agriculture, and manufacturing, particularly the production of wine, apples and machinery. Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “canederli” (a type of dumpling), “speck” (a type of smoked ham) and “knödel” (a type of dumpling). The region is also known for its wines such as Trentino’s Merlot, Pinot Nero and Teroldego and Alto Adige’s Pinot Grigio, Gewürztraminer, and Lagrein.

Umbria

Umbria is a region in central Italy, located in the heart of the country. Its capital is Perugia. The region is known for its picturesque landscapes, including rolling hills, forests, and lakes, as well as for its rich cultural heritage, including the works of famous artists such as Perugino and Pinturicchio. The economy of the region is based on agriculture, particularly the cultivation of olives and grapes, and on tourism. Umbria is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “strangozzi” (a type of pasta), “trippa alla Perugina” (a tripe dish), and “porchetta” (a slow-roasted pork dish). The region is also known for its wines such as Sagrantino di Montefalco, Torgiano Rosso Riserva, and the white wines like Orvieto and Verdicchio.

Veneto

Veneto is a region in northeastern Italy, located in the Po Valley. Its capital is Venice. The region is known for its natural beauty, including the Dolomites mountain range and the Venetian Lagoon, as well as for its rich cultural heritage, including the works of famous artists such as Titian and Tintoretto. The economy of the region is based on tourism, manufacturing and agriculture. It is a major wine-producing region in Italy, famous for its wines like Soave, Prosecco, Bardolino and Amarone. The region is also famous for its traditional cuisine, which features dishes such as “risi e bisi” (a type of rice and pea soup), “polenta” (a type of cornmeal porridge) and “baccalà alla vicentina” (a dish of salt cod).

List of Italian Regions

RegionStatusPopulation (2022)Area km²CapitalProv. Or metrop. Cities
AbruzzoOrdinary128600010,832 km2 (4,182 sq mi)L’Aquila4
Aosta ValleyAutonomous1280003,261 km2 (1,259 sq mi)Aosta1
ApuliaOrdinary392400019,541 km2 (7,545 sq mi)Bari6
BasilicataOrdinary54600010,073 km2 (3,889 sq mi)Potenza2
CalabriaOrdinary185000015,222 km2 (5,877 sq mi)Catanzaro5
CampaniaOrdinary560300013,671 km2 (5,278 sq mi)Naples5
Emilia-RomagnaOrdinary444200022,453 km2 (8,669 sq mi)Bologna9
Friuli-Venezia GiuliaAutonomous12040007,924 km2 (3,059 sq mi)Trieste4
LazioOrdinary572400017,232 km2 (6,653 sq mi)Rome5
LiguriaOrdinary15150005,416 km2 (2,091 sq mi)Genoa4
LombardyOrdinary1031100023,864 km2 (9,214 sq mi)Milan12
MarcheOrdinary15020009,401 km2 (3,630 sq mi)Ancona5
MoliseOrdinary3030004,461 km2 (1,722 sq mi)Campobasso2
PiedmontOrdinary426000025,387 km2 (9,802 sq mi)Turin8
SardiniaAutonomous158400024,100 km2 (9,300 sq mi)Cagliari5
SicilyAutonomous481000025,832 km2 (9,974 sq mi)Palermo9
Trentino-South TyrolAutonomous110200013,606 km2 (5,253 sq mi)Trento2
TuscanyOrdinary368300022,987 km2 (8,875 sq mi)Florence10
UmbriaOrdinary9090008,464 km2 (3,268 sq mi)Perugia2
VenetoOrdinary486200018,345 km2 (7,083 sq mi)Venice7

 

How many regions are there in italy?
How many regions are there in italy?